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Anthony Albanese says Donald Trump’s conviction won’t affect Australia’s relationship with the US if he is re-elected as president

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Anthony Albanese has sidestepped questions on Donald Trump‘s conviction, saying it was a ‘matter for the US’ where he could still be re-elected as president later this year.

But the Prime Minister said there would be no effect on Australia’s relationship with the US whether Mr Trump or incumbent Democrat President Joe Biden won in November.

‘I’m certainly not worried about our relationship with the United States because it’s a relationship between our peoples based upon shared values of democratic principles,’ Mr Albanese said on Friday.

Anthony Albanese has sidestepped questions on Donald Trump 's conviction

Anthony Albanese has sidestepped questions on Donald Trump ‘s conviction 

Donald Trump was convicted of 34 felony counts of falsifying business records over cover up money he paid to adult film star Stormy Daniels during the 2016 presidential election

Donald Trump was convicted of 34 felony counts of falsifying business records over cover up money he paid to adult film star Stormy Daniels during the 2016 presidential election

Earlier Foreign Minister Penny Wong said she wouldn’t comment on Mr Trump, but reiterated that ‘we have a very strong relationship and that will continue’.

The presumptive Republican nominee was convicted of 34 felony counts of falsifying business records over cover up money he paid to adult film star Stormy Daniels during the 2016 presidential election.

Mr Trump’s criminal conviction won’t disqualify him from running as a presidential candidate, according to US law, making it entirely possible he will appear on the ballots come November 5.

Mr Albanese said it would not be ‘appropriate’ to offer his opinions about the court proceedings of other countries, although he acknowledged there would be ‘a lot of public focus on this verdict.’

‘This is a decision of the US court that we don’t comment (on) where we’re not participants in court processes of other countries,’ Mr Albanese said in Sydney shortly after the verdict was delivered in a New York court.

‘The presidential election later this year is a matter for the people of the United States.’

Asked if Mr Trump would be permitted to visit Australia with a criminal conviction, Mr Albanese replied: ‘I’m not going down that rabbit hole.’

Opposition Leader Peter Dutton offered a more detailed reaction to the verdict which happened live while he was appearing on breakfast television.

Opposition Leader Peter Dutton offered a more detailed reaction to the verdict

Opposition Leader Peter Dutton offered a more detailed reaction to the verdict 

‘If you look back to 2016, he won no electoral votes in New York. He’s despised there. There’s obviously two tribes here and the one tribe who detest him and hate him,’ Mr Dutton told Channel Nine’s Today show.

‘And you saw some of the emotion in some of the interviews, just then. And the other tribe, love him and adore him, and for different reasons on both sides.

‘All it will do is reinforce the views on both of those camps. But obviously it will make for an even more exciting election, I suppose, in November.’

In a statement posted on X, Greens Leader Adam Bandt urged Australia to reconsider its relationship with its closest ally.

‘Donald Trump is unfit to be President and would be a disaster for the USA, Australia & the world if he is elected again,’ Mr Bandt said.

Education Minister Jason Clare said the announcement was ‘the biggest news in the world’ but followed Mr Albanese’s lead to refrain from directly commenting on Mr Trump’s conviction.

‘Obviously it’s a decision for the American people to make later this year about who the next president,’ he added.

Asked about what the ruling meant for Australia, deputy Liberal leader Sussan Ley said relations between the two countries were ‘more important and bigger than any one individual.’

‘Irrespective of who the president is or the prime minister is or which party’s in office, the ties that bind our two countries together are strong and everlasting,’ she said.

Donald Trump’s sentencing has been scheduled for July 11.

He faces fines of up to $7,500 and a maximum of four years in prison for each of the 34 felony counts he was convicted of, however experts believe jail time would be unlikely because he’s a first-time offender.



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